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What is a Periodontist?

A periodontist is a dentist that specializes in two areas: periodontal disease and dental implants. More specifically, a periodontist is trained to prevent, diagnose, and treat periodontal disease, as well as in how to place dental implants. Periodontists receive three years of additional education after they have completed dental school.

PeriodontistWhat does a Periodontist do?

Periodontal Therapy:

In the trickier cases of periodontal disease, a general dentist will typically refer you to see a periodontist. A periodontist is trained in dealing with more sever cases of gum disease, and cases where the patient has a complex medical history. There are several types of therapy available, including scaling and root planing, laser gum therapy, and surgical options.

Dental Implants:

In addition to treating your gums, a periodontist is specially trained to place dental implants.

Oral Surgery:

Along with providing treatment for periodontal disease and placing dental implants, periodontists may perform several types of oral surgery, including wisdom tooth removal, a sinus lift, a ridge augmentation, tooth extractions, and soft tissue grafting.

Cosmetic Services:

Most periodontists will have options available to improve the cosmetics of your smile. If you suffer from a gummy smile, your periodontist can perform a procedure that removes excess gum tissue from around your teeth, and allows more of your teeth to show. In this procedure, a laser will reshape the gums to enhance your smile. Other cosmetic treatments may be available, like a gum graft or crown lengthening, depending on the periodontist.


It is important to receive treatment for periodontal disease. If you start to develop gum disease and do not receive treatment, many other health problems can then begin to develop. Gum disease has been linked to many other diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more! Gum disease can cause other oral health problems, as well loss of teeth and jaw bone structure.

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